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Posts Tagged ‘thoroughbred racing’

#20 Wicked Strong, #4 Danza, #1 Vicar’s In Trouble. My #Longshot, CROCKER SHOCKER PICKā„¢ could be #10 Wildcat Red! California Chrome going to choke outside his home state. #KentuckyDerby Free Kentucky Derby Form for the whole race card. http://www.brisnet.com/php/bw_pdf_viewer.php?track=CD&race=11&param1=3740&param2=204&param3=1484318Image

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This 4 year old filly has missed four days of training because the ground is simply too hard and dangerous to train on. The recent snow and ice, that has plagued the majority of the United Sates, has interrupted training operations at Crocker Racing. Currently we are training at a farm where we can take advantage of the safer footing and uphill terrain. We train at various speeds and intensities, three to five miles a day. A thoroughbred race horse training on a dirt race track probably wouldn’t hold up to the same training that can be accomplished on natural footing. I have never liked dirt tracks for race horses and believe a dirt track contributes to the majority of breakdowns in North America. Horses training and racing on dirt are limited to the distance and intensity of training they can tolerate without the risking serious injuries. In a perfect world, all horses would be racing and training on grass. Most tracks, unfortunately, are dirt and we must train accordingly. The all weather, synthetic surfaces were designed to simulate the feel and give of turf, reducing racing injuries to horses. Michael Dickinson introduced this synthetic material to thoroughbred racing in hopes to accomplish a safer race track. More on synthetic tracks in another posting. I’ll go into the pros and cons of the Tepta race track.

Crocker Racing Stable Filly 2014

3YO Filly trained by Chris Crocker. Crocker Racing Stable.

This funny filly just can’t contain herself after having 4 days of only turnout. She can gallop and jog in her 1/2 acre paddock, but she feels the need for speed. She loves to train and the day following this video, she was a bear to gallop. She was not fun to ride at all. She was leaping out of her skin. The video was posted on a social media site and while most found it cute, that she was so full of energy and happy, others started creating their own story. One person posted that it was cruel to keep a race horse cooped up in a stall. She obviously didn’t notice the open door to a large paddock and didn’t take a second to read the video description that accompanied the YouTube post. One person even tried to tell us the blanket was bothering her. She has been in this exact same blanket for a month. She was actually reacting to the feed buckets rattling and the blower that we use to clean out the barn. You can post anything online and someone will find something bad to say about it. A basket of kittens can even prompt a negative comment. People who are not involved with horse racing get a lot of misinformation from people who think they know what goes on at race tracks. I have found that these people don’t realize how much these horses are loved and cared for at the track. In any business, there are people who disgrace their industry with unethical acts and practices. Horse racing is not immune to these bad apples. We need to educate the public about the positive sides of racing and I hope to help do that in future postings.

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This workout was recorded, using the GoPro Hero 3 Helmet Camera, at Colonial Downs on the opening day of training 2013. Trainer Christopher Crocker aboard. This particular horse is a dud on the dirt. This was a very sluggish workout for him. He is much sharper on the turf or tight fast track.

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